• PUBLISHED Oct 17, 2006

  • PUBLISHED

    Oct 17 2006
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  • PUBLISHED Oct 17, 2006

  • PUBLISHED

    Oct 17 2006
  • THIS VIDEO

    4717 Views
    0 Votes
  • OVERALL RANK

    3275 th Views
    12869 th Votes
  • PEAK CHART RANK

    N/A Overall

BALCONYTV.COM 17/10/2006
PRESENTED BY PAULINE FREEMAN (KINDA)
A psychodynamic approach to understanding creativity was proposed by Sigmund Freud, who suggested that creativity arises as a result of frustrated desires for fame, fortune, and love, with the energy that was previously tied up in frustration and emotional tension in the neurosis being sublimated into creative activity. Freud later retracted this view.
The neurobiology of creativity has been discussed by Fred Balzac in an article on "Exploring the Brain's Role in Creativity".
The study found that creative innovation requires "coactivation and communication between regions of the brain that ordinarily are not strongly connected". Highly creative people who excel at creative innovation tend to differ from others in three ways: they have a high level of specialized knowledge, they are capable of divergent thinking mediated by the frontal lobe, and they are able to modulate neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine in their frontal lobe. Thus, the frontal lobe appears to be the part of the cortex that is most important for creativity. The study also explored the links between creativity and sleep, mood and addiction disorders, and depression.
A study by the psychologist J. Philippe Rushton found that creativity correlated with intelligence and psychoticism.[17] Additionally, a different study found that creativity is greater in schizotypal individuals than either normal or fully schizophrenic individuals. While divergent thinking was associated with bilateral activation of the prefrontal cortex, schizotypal individuals were found to have much greater activation of their right prefrontal cortex.[18] This study hypothesizes that these individuals are better at accessing both hemispheres, allowing them to make novel associations at a faster rate. In agreement with this hypothesis, ambidexterity is also associated with schizotypal and schizophrenic individuals. Creativity has also been associated with bipolar disorder.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creativity

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